Junk Orbit

Available two weeks early!

Space — the final junkyard. Good thing one planet’s trash is another planet’s treasure! In Junk Orbit, you’re captain of your own scavenger ship, picking up space junk and transporting it to any city that will take it. Launch your junk … uh, *cargo* … out of your airlock to propel your ship! Race to deliver your cargo as you navigate the orbits of nearby planets and moons! It’s astrodynamics for fun and profit! On your turn, carry out these three steps:

1. Launch junk — Choose any one junk tile in your cargo hold and move it away from your ship (clockwise or counter-clockwise, your choice) a number of spaces equal to its numeric value. If it reaches its destination city this way, you have made a remote delivery. Otherwise, it simply comes to rest after moving its full distance. It is also possible to hit an enemy ship with launched junk, causing that opponent to discard one junk tile from their cargo.

2. Move ship — Your ship must now move the same distance that your launched junk did, but in the opposite direction. When your ship reaches a transfer point between location boards, you may choose to switch orbits. If you do, your ship changes direction (from clockwise to counter-clockwise, or vice versa) as it enters the new orbit. If the space your ship lands on is the destination of any junk in your cargo, you have made a direct delivery.

3. Pick up junk — After moving your ship, pick up all junk tiles present in your current city, adding them to your cargo hold. Then, refill your current city with one new junk tile from the corresponding stack (e.g., if at a Mars city, refill from the Mars stack).

Each player has their own ship with a unique ship power that breaks the rules above in some way. The end of the game is triggered when a city cannot be refilled because its stack is empty. When this happens, every player gets one final turn, then players tally the values from all of their delivered junk tiles, and whoever has the highest total wins.

The Tea Dragon Society

Discover the ancient art form of Tea Dragon care-taking within The Tea Dragon Society Card Game, based on the graphic novel The Tea Dragon Society. Create a bond between yourself and your Tea Dragon that grows as you progress through the seasons, creating memories to share forever.

Each player’s deck represents their own Tea Dragon. From turn to turn, players choose to draw a card — triggering effects and strengthening their position — or buy a card, improving their deck or scoring points. The game takes place over four seasons, starting in spring and ending in winter. At the end of winter, the player who has the most points wins.

Adventures in Middle-earth: Rivendell Region Guide

The Rivendell Region Guide takes your adventures West across the Misty Mountains to the Last Homely House, expanding play into eastern Eriador, covering not only Rivendell itself, but Angmar, Fornost, Mount Gram, Tharbad and everywhere in between. There are also rules for creating your own Magical Treasure; playing High Elves of Rivendell; turning the baleful Eye of Mordor on your company; and facing more powerful adversaries than ever before. This gorgeous hardcover, 144-page, full-colour supplement includes:
• Background for the Last Homely House, Rivendell, the sanctuary of Imladris.
• Write-ups of the characters that might be encountered in Imladris, from Elrond and Arwen to Glorfindel and the White Council.
• New Fellowship undertakings.
• A history of Arnor, Angmar and the Rangers of the North.
• A region guide to Eastern Eriador, including the Barrow-downs, the Trollshaws and Angmar.
• New adversaries to face, including Ettins, Hill-men of Rhudaur and the toughest Troll of them all, the Queen of Castle Hill.
• A bestiary of undead creatures, from Bog Soldiers and Barrow-wights to the Lord of the Nazgûl himself, the Witch-king of Angmar.
• Rules for powerful adversaries, allowing you to customise any monster to provide a
challenge for even the most heroic of adventurers.
• A set of optional rules, the Eye of Mordor, to track how much attention the Enemy reserves for the company.
• Rules for adding Magical Treasure to your campaign, including dozens of ready-made
artefacts, some famous, others less so.
• A new playable Heroic Culture: the High Elves of Rivendell.

Cataclysm: A Second World War

It is the 1930s and the world is still recovering from the Great War and the Great Depression that followed it. A second world war can break out at any time. Can you stop it? Will you start it? Better yet, can you win it?

Cataclysm is not your typical game about World War II. The game begins in 1933, not 1939, and is global in scope. Germany is far from dominating Europe. Japan is on the march in Asia. Every crisis is an unexpected opportunity. There is no hindsight and anything can happen.

Truly grand strategic in scope, Cataclysm requires players to lead nations, not just armies or fleets. You must craft a diplomatic strategy, develop political support for your policies at home, shift your economy to a war footing, and build up the forces you need to deter or vanquish your enemies.

There is no traditional I-go-you-go turn structure in Cataclysm. Counters representing political actions, military actions, units, and possible events are drawn at random from an action cup. As each counter comes out, the owning player resolves it, and play swiftly moves on to the next draw. You have to make plans to execute when your chance comes up, but you have no idea when, or in what order, events will transpire.

A game about global war gives every nation armies, air forces, and fleets. But in Cataclysm, military pieces have no numeric values. You know what forces you have and where they are deployed. To resolve combat, each side rolls up to three dice and compares their single highest die. You can devote more resources to a campaign (generating more dice or bonuses), but that does not guarantee a favorable outcome. Your efforts can lead to triumph… or to disaster.

In Cataclysm, you are free to explore alternatives. The Soviets can construct a massive long-range bomber force. Japan can build powerful armored forces to overrun Siberia. Germany can invade Britain, or France can take Berlin, provided you craft a strategy that gets you there.

When you play Cataclysm, you write your own history of a second world war.

Fort Sumter: The Secession Crisis, 1860-61

Fort Sumter is a two-player Card Driven Game (CDG) portraying the 1860 secession crisis that led to the bombardment of Fort Sumter and the American Civil War. Fort Sumter is a small footprint game (11×17” mounted map) that takes approximately 25-40 minutes to play. The game pits a Unionist versus a Secessionist player. Each player uses the area control mechanic pioneered in Mark Herman’s We The People design and immortalized in Twilight Struggle to place, move, and remove political capital. The location of political capital determines who controls each of the four crisis dimensions (Political, Secession, Public Opinion, and Armaments). After three rounds of play, the game culminates in a Final Crisis confrontation to determine the winner.

The heart of the Fort Sumter design is Mark’s CDG system where you use Strategy cards for their value or historic event to acquire political capital from the crisis track. Political capital tokens are used to compete for control of the twelve map spaces. Here the likes of William Lloyd Garrison, Sam Houston, Jefferson Davis, and Harriet Beecher Stowe walk on stage, while the Southern states dissolve the Union.

The twelve map spaces are grouped into the four dimensions of the crisis. You gain a victory point each round that you control a dimension’s three spaces. For example, the Armaments dimension is characterized by Federal Arsenals, Fort Pickens, and of course, Fort Sumter. In addition, each round you score a victory point for controlling your secret objective space. But beware; either player can score active objective spaces. At the end of the dual Presidential inaugurations (round three) a new Final Crisis mechanic drives the game to its hotly contested conclusion.

Utilizing a new Final Crisis Series mechanic, you may accelerate the crisis by breaching zones (escalation, tension, final crisis) that yield bonus political capital. However, beware, as the first person to breach the final crisis zone gains political advantage, yet loses victory point ground. Each game ends with a Final Crisis, where cards set-aside during the three rounds complete your final political maneuvers that determine the winner.